Acer S1385WHne

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Acer S1385WHne

Naim Audio Mu-so

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Naim Audio Mu-so

Hulk Hogan asks Pinellas judge for Gawker investigation into leaks

Hulk Hogan made his first public appearance in a St. Petersburg courtroom Thursday since the WWE dropped the famous wrestler last week for making homophobic and racist comments on a sex tape.

Hogan blames Gawker for leaking the damaging information and in an emergency motion asked Judge Pamela Campbell to allow a forensic expert to look at the gossip websites electronic records to prove it.

“What our motion is based on, judge, is Gawker’s inadvertent attempts … to get sealed court documents leaked into the media,” said Hogan’s attorney, Kenneth Turkel. “Ruining my client’s career and potentially ruining his right to a fair trial.”

The attorney for Gawker, Seth Berlin, adamantly denied that his client or law firm leaked any information that’s under court seal and called the motion the last refuge of a desperate litigant.

“I understand why they are upset about the circumstances to which they find themselves but it is not on us,” Berlin said. “Gawker and its lawyers were not responsible for this leak.”

Hogan has been locked in a bitter $100 million lawsuit against Gawker for publishing a portion of a 2007 sex tape involving Bubba The Love Sponge’s former wife, Heather Clem, that appeared on the website in 2012. The Enquirer and RadarOnLine.com published racist comments from that sex tape last Friday, where Hogan repeatedly uses the “n” word. Hogan apologized for the offensive language.

Both media outlets claimed to have five independent sources for that transcript. Berlin said many people are aware of Hogan’s comments and those are the likely sources of the leak.

“There are, your honor, a long list, a long list of people who knew about Mr. Bollea’s use of racist language,” he said. “Long before Gawker knew about it, long before Gawker published its story … There is no basis to go forward with a motion that seeks extraordinarily intrusive electronic discovery.”

Turkel said the Enquirer quotes matched closely to one of the highly confidential transcripts and asked the judge for help.

“My client’s got literally nowhere else to go right now other than you to control what they’ve done,” he said. “You are literally his only hope for justice. Just to get this case tried.”

Judge Campbell said she would have to read through the motion and will make a decision on the discovery matter later. The judge also set March 7, 2016, as the new trial date for the lawsuit.

Hogan’s court appearance has the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office apologizing for giving the wrestler special treatment as he left the building. Instead of being forced to walk out the front doors of the courthouse to face reporters and cameras, a bailiff escorted Hogan out a back exit in a restricted area. The bailiff also asked a photojournalist in that area to move back and walked Hogan to his attorney’s pickup truck.

“There was an error on the part of deputies allowing him (Hogan) to exit the side door,” said spokeswoman Cecilia Barreda. “It was preferential treatment and shouldn’t have happened.” 

http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/baynews9/news/article.html/content/news/articles/bn9/2015/7/30/hogan_gawker_leaks_/?cid=rss

Hulk Hogan asks Pinellas judge for Gawker investigation into leaks

JBL Charge 2+

The $150-and-up price range is where portable Bluetooth speakers start delivering robust audio with more powerful bass response. With most genres of music, the $149.99 JBL Charge 2+ delivers a rich, crisp sound with an impressive sense of bass, but tracks with seriously deep lows can make the speaker distort dramatically at top volumes. Whether this is a major issue really depends on what type of music you listen to most often. For those whose libraries don’t have lots of deep bass tracks, the splash-proof design of the Charge 2+, along with its ability to connect to three Bluetooth devices at once and charge mobile devices, will outweigh this negative. If you want distortion-free bass, you might want to consider paying $50 more for the Editors’ Choice Bose SoundLink Mini II instead.

Design

Available in a variety of bright colors, the cylindrical, 3.1-by-7.3-by-3.1-inch, 1.3-pound Charge 2+ is on the large end of the spectrum of portable Bluetooth speakers. The speaker is splash-proof, so it can hang pool-side, but it isn’t fully waterproof, so you shouldn’t take it into the pool itself. A passive bass radiator on both ends of the cylinder pushes out low frequencies, while dual 45mm drivers deliver 15W through the main speaker grilles that take up most of the Charge 2+’s real estate. A rubberized stand on the bottom of the speaker keeps it from rolling around or dancing across tabletops when the music vibrations are intense.

The control panel across the top has buttons for Power, Bluetooth Pairing, Volume Up/Down (the level works together with, not independently of, your mobile device’s volume), Social Mode (more on that in a moment), and a multi-purpose Phone/Play/Pause button. You can also navigate a track forward by pressing this button twice quickly, though we had trouble navigating backwards, which is typically three taps–it’s probably best to navigate on your actual device when you have the option. The pinhole mic for the speakerphone function is also located on this panel.JBL Charge 2+ inline

The “Social Mode” is a nice feature that allows you to connect up to three devices simultaneously. Once all are connected, music can stream from any of the paired devices. Whichever device you press play on immediately gets preference, making the stream halt and switch, so there’s also potential for some shenanigans between friends or siblings with devices paired to the same Charge 2+.

JBL estimates the battery life for the Charge 2+ to be roughly 12 hours, and the USB port lets you charge mobile devices with the speaker’s battery. A USB charging cable and wall adapter are included with the speaker. However, that’s it for accessories–there’s no carrying pouch, and although there’s a 3.5mm Aux input for wired audio listening, there’s no cable included.

Performance

The Charge 2+ delivers robust bass for a portable speaker. But on tracks with powerful sub-bass content, like The Knife’s “Silent Shout,” it also distorts dramatically at top volumes. It would be one thing if maximum volume were obscenely loud, but the Charge 2+ can only get moderately loud, especially for outdoor use–it’s easy to see this being the default volume level you use poolside or in the backyard. So, if your music library has a lot of deep-bass tracks in it, it’s probably best to consider a different option that either doesn’t distort, like the Bose SoundLink Mini II, or that can deliver massive bass (also without distorting), like the outdoor-friendly, not-so-portable (and much more expensive) Soundcast Melody. At moderate volumes, the distortion disappears and the Charge 2+ delivers a rich bass response.

Related StorySee How We Test Speakers

This richness comes across far better on tracks with less intense deep bass, like Bill Callahan’s “Drover.” His baritone vocals are delivered with smooth presence in the low-mids, matched with some high-mid treble edge. The drums on this track get a nice amount of bass boosting to them. It’s nothing insane, just enough to add a bit of roundness to their sustain, and it gives the mix a nice anchor in the lows to match its crisp highs. There’s no distortion to speak of at maximum volume on this track, and the passive bass radiators sound off in all of their glory. It’s a very full sound.

On Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “No Church in the Wild,” the kick drum loop’s attack gets plenty of high-mid presence through the Charge 2+, giving it a sharpness that slices through the layers of the mix with ease. The loop’s sustain also packs a low-mid punch, while the sub-bass synth hits are delivered with a modest sense of deep bass (though there’s nothing like a subwoofer-type delivery here). The vocals get plenty of high-mid and high frequency presence, allowing to them hover cleanly over the entire mix. At top volumes, the bass on this track also doesn’t distort, so the distortion really is on a case-by-case basis.

Classical tracks, like the opening scene in John Adams’ The Gospel According to the Other Mary, get some added bass response, allowing the lower register instrumentation to have a heightened presence in the mix. The higher register vocals, strings, and brass still have most of the spotlight here, however. This is a sound signature that adds a bit of depth and brightness to the proceedings, but purists looking for a flatter response will find things a bit too sculpted.

One annoyance: When navigating to new tracks, the Charge 2+ consistently lopped off the first half-second or so of a track. This is a typical problem with cheaper Bluetooth speakers, but it’s a little more rare to encounter in this price range.

Distortion and the track navigation issue aside, the Charge 2+ is a capable speaker for most music genres that can certainly deliver a robust sense of bass when it isn’t challenged with the very deepest sub-bass the music world has to offer. However, if you want to avoid distortion completely, the aforementioned Bose and Soundcast models are good bets. If you’re looking for a speaker that is actually fully waterproof–not just splash-proof, check out the Braven BRV-Pro. And if all of these options are bit more expensive than your budget allows, consider JBL’s own Clip+, an affordable, water-resistant portable Bluetooth speaker with some solid audio performance for the price. Deep bass fiends, the JBL Charge 2+ probably isn’t for you. But if your music library exists more in the rock and pop realm–or jazz and classical, for that matter–the Charge 2+ won’t likely give you distortion trouble, and it’s a solid option to consider in this price range.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2487819,00.asp?kc=PCRSS05079TX1K0000994

JBL Charge 2+

JBL Charge 2+

The $150-and-up price range is where portable Bluetooth speakers start delivering robust audio with more powerful bass response. With most genres of music, the $149.99 JBL Charge 2+ delivers a rich, crisp sound with an impressive sense of bass, but tracks with seriously deep lows can make the speaker distort dramatically at top volumes. Whether this is a major issue really depends on what type of music you listen to most often. For those whose libraries don’t have lots of deep bass tracks, the splash-proof design of the Charge 2+, along with its ability to connect to three Bluetooth devices at once and charge mobile devices, will outweigh this negative. If you want distortion-free bass, you might want to consider paying $50 more for the Editors’ Choice Bose SoundLink Mini II instead.

Design

Available in a variety of bright colors, the cylindrical, 3.1-by-7.3-by-3.1-inch, 1.3-pound Charge 2+ is on the large end of the spectrum of portable Bluetooth speakers. The speaker is splash-proof, so it can hang pool-side, but it isn’t fully waterproof, so you shouldn’t take it into the pool itself. A passive bass radiator on both ends of the cylinder pushes out low frequencies, while dual 45mm drivers deliver 15W through the main speaker grilles that take up most of the Charge 2+’s real estate. A rubberized stand on the bottom of the speaker keeps it from rolling around or dancing across tabletops when the music vibrations are intense.

The control panel across the top has buttons for Power, Bluetooth Pairing, Volume Up/Down (the level works together with, not independently of, your mobile device’s volume), Social Mode (more on that in a moment), and a multi-purpose Phone/Play/Pause button. You can also navigate a track forward by pressing this button twice quickly, though we had trouble navigating backwards, which is typically three taps–it’s probably best to navigate on your actual device when you have the option. The pinhole mic for the speakerphone function is also located on this panel.JBL Charge 2+ inline

The “Social Mode” is a nice feature that allows you to connect up to three devices simultaneously. Once all are connected, music can stream from any of the paired devices. Whichever device you press play on immediately gets preference, making the stream halt and switch, so there’s also potential for some shenanigans between friends or siblings with devices paired to the same Charge 2+.

JBL estimates the battery life for the Charge 2+ to be roughly 12 hours, and the USB port lets you charge mobile devices with the speaker’s battery. A USB charging cable and wall adapter are included with the speaker. However, that’s it for accessories–there’s no carrying pouch, and although there’s a 3.5mm Aux input for wired audio listening, there’s no cable included.

Performance

The Charge 2+ delivers robust bass for a portable speaker. But on tracks with powerful sub-bass content, like The Knife’s “Silent Shout,” it also distorts dramatically at top volumes. It would be one thing if maximum volume were obscenely loud, but the Charge 2+ can only get moderately loud, especially for outdoor use–it’s easy to see this being the default volume level you use poolside or in the backyard. So, if your music library has a lot of deep-bass tracks in it, it’s probably best to consider a different option that either doesn’t distort, like the Bose SoundLink Mini II, or that can deliver massive bass (also without distorting), like the outdoor-friendly, not-so-portable (and much more expensive) Soundcast Melody. At moderate volumes, the distortion disappears and the Charge 2+ delivers a rich bass response.

Related StorySee How We Test Speakers

This richness comes across far better on tracks with less intense deep bass, like Bill Callahan’s “Drover.” His baritone vocals are delivered with smooth presence in the low-mids, matched with some high-mid treble edge. The drums on this track get a nice amount of bass boosting to them. It’s nothing insane, just enough to add a bit of roundness to their sustain, and it gives the mix a nice anchor in the lows to match its crisp highs. There’s no distortion to speak of at maximum volume on this track, and the passive bass radiators sound off in all of their glory. It’s a very full sound.

On Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “No Church in the Wild,” the kick drum loop’s attack gets plenty of high-mid presence through the Charge 2+, giving it a sharpness that slices through the layers of the mix with ease. The loop’s sustain also packs a low-mid punch, while the sub-bass synth hits are delivered with a modest sense of deep bass (though there’s nothing like a subwoofer-type delivery here). The vocals get plenty of high-mid and high frequency presence, allowing to them hover cleanly over the entire mix. At top volumes, the bass on this track also doesn’t distort, so the distortion really is on a case-by-case basis.

Classical tracks, like the opening scene in John Adams’ The Gospel According to the Other Mary, get some added bass response, allowing the lower register instrumentation to have a heightened presence in the mix. The higher register vocals, strings, and brass still have most of the spotlight here, however. This is a sound signature that adds a bit of depth and brightness to the proceedings, but purists looking for a flatter response will find things a bit too sculpted.

One annoyance: When navigating to new tracks, the Charge 2+ consistently lopped off the first half-second or so of a track. This is a typical problem with cheaper Bluetooth speakers, but it’s a little more rare to encounter in this price range.

Distortion and the track navigation issue aside, the Charge 2+ is a capable speaker for most music genres that can certainly deliver a robust sense of bass when it isn’t challenged with the very deepest sub-bass the music world has to offer. However, if you want to avoid distortion completely, the aforementioned Bose and Soundcast models are good bets. If you’re looking for a speaker that is actually fully waterproof–not just splash-proof, check out the Braven BRV-Pro. And if all of these options are bit more expensive than your budget allows, consider JBL’s own Clip+, an affordable, water-resistant portable Bluetooth speaker with some solid audio performance for the price. Deep bass fiends, the JBL Charge 2+ probably isn’t for you. But if your music library exists more in the rock and pop realm–or jazz and classical, for that matter–the Charge 2+ won’t likely give you distortion trouble, and it’s a solid option to consider in this price range.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2487819,00.asp?kc=PCRSS05079TX1K0000994

JBL Charge 2+

Sonos Will Support Apple Music by Year’s End

Sonos won’t be ready for Apple Music when it launches, but Sonos will support the new streaming service at some point this year.

We understand why you have outfitted (or might be tempted to outfit) your house with every Sonos device you possibly can. It’s kind of neat to be able to stream music from a variety of different online services to speakers all around your house. If you’re really a music fan, you can even stream different songs to different locations—perfect if you want your outdoor party to be a little more EDM, but want a bit more chill than chaos for inside.

While Sonos works with a number of the major streaming services, including Spotify, Pandora, Google Play, Amazon Music, and Rdio, one icon conspicuously absent from its list of supported services is an Apple. When Apple Music launches on June 30 at 8 a.m. PT, Sonos won’t immediately support the newest streaming service on the block, but it’s coming.

“Sonos will not have Apple Music on it at launch but we fully expect to support them when they’re ready to focus on the home listening experience. Right now they’re fully focused on mobile,” said a Sonos representative in June, as reported by 9to5Mac.

Unnamed Apple sources have since narrowed down the timeline for the service’s potential arrival on Sonos’s platform.

“We’re working together to make #AppleMusic available on Sonos before the end of the year,” an Apple representative told BuzzFeed.

If you’re antsy, you could also use a workaround to get AirPlay working with your Sonos devices. (That is, of course, assuming that Apple Music will allow you to send your tunes to other devices and speakers via AirPlay.)

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2486928,00.asp?kc=PCRSS05079TX1K0000994

Sonos Will Support Apple Music by Year’s End

Clearwater police set to begin using body cameras

By Jason Lanning , Reporter

Last Updated: Wednesday, July 08, 2015, 7:17 AM

CLEARWATER — 

Another Bay area law enforcement agency is putting on body cameras.

Clearwater police are set to test the cameras in a new pilot program. The program, which starts next weekend, isn’t necessarily to gather evidence.  

Clearwater is following the Pasco County Sheriff’s Office, Gulfport police and Tampa police in trying the cameras.

According to the Tampa Bay Times, Clearwater police are trying out the cameras because they will allow the public to witness how challenging the job of police officers have.

Five officers will begin wearing cameras Saturday as part of a 30-day pilot program. The officers will either wear cameras on the front of their uniforms or their  sunglasses.

The officers in the pilot program all work in District 2, which includes downtown, the North Greenwood area and Missouri Avenue.

The department waited to implement body cameras until legislation passed, better defining how and when body camera video can be released to the public.

http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/baynews9/news/article.html/content/news/articles/bn9/2015/7/8/clearwater_police_se/?cid=rss

Clearwater police set to begin using body cameras